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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he was there, i know ter theresa sparks was there, i was so proud of san francisco in being there because the superintendent, he's, you can
took it to washington dc earlier in the summer, so we have been working with maryland and virginia and all over california and hopefully washington soon and really excited to get everybody interested with the information. >> somebody asked how do you implement a restorative justice program? do you have that answer. >> that's a good question and it's definitely county specific in california they noticed because i have done training in this program in different counties and i always invite the local da and the probation department and there are nuisances in every state and county and everyone wants to help. no one says no. they ask what they need to do to get on board and everybody is making it work and ways of it fitting in their system. >> there are a number of definitions of restorative justice i noticed and going to bullying prevention conversations in the country. some of them areis bad on native american tribal practices and i remember one teacher of restorative justice that did training in a lot of schools and talking about how there was a child who had offended another chi
of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introduction -- no, i get to say something. i get to say something. as everyone in this room knows, youngest mayor in 100 years, right? youngest mayor in 100 years when he was elected 10 years ago and he has remained an effective and visionary leader for everyone. mayor newsom gained worldwide recognition when he granted marriage l
's meeting in washington state and i would like to congratulate you and especially those in law enforcement in california for the high level of discourse that you have incredibly impressed today by what i have heard and my hats off to you for all the good work you're doing. so i do advocacy and part of that is kind of reaching out to people and bringing the message of social emotional learning not just to schools because educators kind of get it. it's not a stretch when we talk to them why it's important to get it, but we want to take the message outside of the school into the media, into the communities, into families so that people kind of understand this process of another way of learning and becoming an educated person. a couple of other things i do i work with anne on the board and with the foundation. that has been exciting. i do advising for sesame street. if you have small children the next seafn sesame street you will see some of the favorite characters and breathing and learning problem solving models and we're very excited -- >> [inaudible] >> and they're focusing on self r
today but sends her greetings from washington, dc i hope you all have the handouts on the table that describe our organization. basically for the last 20 years, our organization has challenged stereotypes and misinformation about muslims and their faith, true education. we believe the bias and discrimination and hate that we see is generally commonly based on lack of information or misinformation and we believe that by providing accurate face to face information about any group that is the best way to combat bias and discrimination. so that's what we've been focusing on for the last 20 years. we go out to schools and other convenient tues and basically talk about what it means to be an american muslim. we have other related presentations that we do as well and a few years ago we also launched an interfaith speakers bureau where we take out representatives of the 5 major religions and do the same thing and we model in front of high school and middle school students how the faiths can sit down like we are sitting here today and have conversations about our commonalities but abo
washington. over the last year alone, we've seen a 34 percent increase just between 2010 and 2011 on bullying and harassment cases. 32 percent of those are about sexual or gender based stereotyping and harassment, 41 percent on disability and 40 percent on race and national origin. we've just started monitoring those trends since 2009 we've been collecting those data. so it appears that while historically we were doing a lot more on things like disability harassment, it's actually a kind of racial harassment that in fact might be getting worse and certainly getting a lot more obvious. one of the ways that we have partnered, department of education and department of justice was right here at the university of california in san diego where you might have heard about the compton cookout and the alleged noose in the library and we have heard similar instances in california and elsewhere, things like (inaudible) the kinds of resolutions and remedies we seek are not just about ensuring that those that were responsible for these activities that caused a hostile environment that adults knew of, sho
't really talked b as a result of that we were invited to the federal summit a year ago in washington dc, and i have to tell you after sitting and hearing a day of stories of all of our children i came away with just something in my stomach that just couldn't let it go. that, this was something that ready had to be addressed and this what was i was going to focus on. at the time we were trying to pursue some federal legislation to protect children with special needs. that wasn't going anywhere. as i heard in the federal summit and heard the issues around the definition of bullying, concerns about policies and procedures, seemed like a lot of people blaming everyone. parents blaming schools and schools blaming parents. there seemed to be a lot of confusion and noise out there and i will never forget at the last session secretary duncan got up and said "this issue is really a very complex issue, and the only way it's going to get addressed is back in your community". well, i took that to heart because i realized that's what needed to be done, and that's why i came back to san mateo c
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)